Katie – Terminally Joyful

Katie lives her life through a joy lens.  Not because her life is perfect.  But because it is fragile and precious.  As a metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient she lives with immense uncertainty and the prospect of never ending treatments.

Yet she isn’t letting this drag her into darkness.  She chooses to live her life of purpose one day at a time.  Not denying the hard, awful, sad days.  But, by truly living the good ones.  She shares, “Ordinary moments like my son bringing me a cool rock are special. I treasure each day more than most people.  I know each day is a gift.”

The reality of MBC is that 115 people die every day from the disease.  Breast cancer isn’t a pink party – it’s a deadly terror that rips young moms from their families, disproportionately kills people of color and is incredibly dangerous when diagnosed in men.  Only one thing is going to change this – RESEARCH.  That’s why we are calling October: Breast Cancer Research Month.   We are committed to shining the pink light on MBC stories and the need for more funding to be directed to MBC research.

Hope Scarves Founder, Lara MacGregor, is launching her new podcast, A Hopeful Life, on Metastatic Breast Cancer Day, Tuesday, October 13th.   Katie is one of her first 4 guests who each share a unique perspective on MBC.  Check it out on itunes, Spotify or where ever you get your podcasts.

You can read more about Katie and follow her beautiful story on her blog, Terminally Joyful.

Dan – Outrunning Cancer

Dan participates in Outrunning Cancer to raise money and awareness for MBC research, to support those in the fight, and to be a part of something bigger than himself.

“So many good memories. I enjoyed the competitive fundraising banter with Lara’s friends from home, the pasta dinner was always great, and riding around in a stinky van with the F3 guys was hilarious.”

“This year, my family and I will OutHike Cancer on Sunday, and the F3 boys will OutRun Cancer on Saturday.”

Join Dan and others doing activities on August 1-2, 2020. This year Outrunning Cancer expands beyond running to any activity that brings you joy. Outswim, outsail, outdance, outwalk, outgarden cancer to raise funds for MBC research and Hope Scarves!

To sign up for Outrunning Cancer or to donate, visit: https://hopescarves.org/connect/events/outrunning/

Team F3 – Outrunning Cancer

Dan joined Outrunning Cancer in 2015 when his wife Allison was diagnosed. Then he organized an F3 Outrunning Cancer team for the 2018 run. 15 men formed 3 teams to complete the Marathon relay, carrying an American Flag and a Hope Scarves Flag for the whole 26.2 miles. They might be a little crazy, but their enthusiasm is a great addition to our team both in fundraising and fun out on the course. We are honored to have F3 as part of the Outrunning Cancer team.

 

F3 stands for Fitness, Fellowship, and Faith. It is a national network of free outdoor men’s workouts, with over 500 active members here in Louisville. The groups meet everyday all over town at 5:30 am, rain or shine, hot or cold. The group is as much about developing relationships and honing leadership as it is about running and pushups. You can find more information about the F3 team at: F3Louisville.com.

Join the F3 team and others doing activities on August 1-2, 2020. This year Outrunning Cancer expands beyond running to any activity that brings you joy. Outswim, outsail, outdance, outwalk, outgarden cancer to raise funds for MBC research and Hope Scarves!

To sign up for Outrunning Cancer or to donate, visit https://hopescarves.org/connect/events/outrunning/

Dr. Beth Riley – Brown Cancer Center

Patient volume at the Brown Cancer Center has remained consistent during COVID-19; we have not seen a drop and continue to treat approximately 200 patients a week. As you know, cancer doesn’t stop (even when everyone else does) and patient treatment must continue. The breast cancer clinic has been impacted by surgery delays. For patients in Kentucky, there has been a roughly 6 week delay, on average. Patients are given alternative medical treatments to adjust to interruptions in the surgery schedule.

Cancer patients are at high risk if they contract COVID and to reduce risk, several measures have been taken. The Brown Cancer Center instituted screenings and social distancing practices for patients. In addition, patients must be tested before procedures. The BCC has seen a rapid rise in telehealth, which is good for people who need updates and other information, and reduces their exposure. Accrual numbers have remained consistent.   

New trials are not being opened locally or nationally. The pharmaceutical companies are not able to open trials right now, although there is a strong desire to do so and move forward, it is not logistically possible at the moment. This is due to many related factors: furloughs, remote working, and national offices located in NYC or other heavily affected areas.  

Patients who were already on trials are able to continue on the trial – so patients continue to be supported by Hope Scarves. However, some trials that Dr. Riley had planned to open had to be put on hold. Sheryl, a patient at BCC, says that she’s grateful her clinical trial is working, and that it gives her hope!

 

Help continue Dr. Riley (and her team’s) clinical trials and remind cancer patients  Hope Isn’t Canceled  by sponsoring a Hope Scarf for $30/month as part of our Hope Isn’t Canceled Sustainability Campaign.  Our goal is to send 400 Hope Scarves each month – please join us!

 

 

 

 

Kim – Kentucky

Nothing about cancer is ‘easy’ or ‘typical.’ A report or doctor might say that, but when it’s your body, it’s personal. It’s everything.”

Kim Landrom, of Louisville, Kentucky knows that all too well. When she had an ovarian cancer scare that turned out to be “only” endometriosis, she was relieved. Until, in the same phone call, she heard a “But…..” from the doctor, who then informed her she had two malignant breast lumps and a malignant lymph node. She was told it was an “easy case” but something told her to push further. She moved her treatment to the James Graham Brown Cancer Center, had a mastectomy, and started radiation. However, soon she learned that cancer was in more lymph nodes, and she started five months of chemo.

“My head was spinning,” says Kim. “I knew then my life just changed. Cancer made it real.” She reached out to Lara MacGregor for support and received her first Hope Scarf. “You don’t understand what it’s like to live with cancer until you experience it,” Kim says. “I am blessed to have an army of support along with friends from Hope Scarves. The connection is amazing.”

“I have accepted my new life and live in the most positive way possible,” Kim adds, “but, there’s no way past it that cancer just sucks.”

Cancer during COVID-19 is equally difficult. The isolation. The fear. The unknown. “I never felt cancer would kill me, but then you throw in the uncertainty around COVID-19,” she says. “You can’t push the limits of cancer and COVID. You have to trust in the nurses and doctors and heal as you can.”

“I have so many people helping me navigate this new life, and I focus on kindness,” Kim says. “When I’m on the other side of treatment, I hope I can be that same support for others.” 

Successful treatment isn’t the end of the road for Kim. “The breast cancer world is so focused on “beating” cancer, but there are no promises,” she says. “In 10 years, I might have MBC. I know I am never truly cancer free. Way too many people die from MBC. You can’t beat MBC without research. It could affect me. It could affect you. MBC needs a cure. I want to help fund and find a cure for MBC,” she says.

“Your research dollars could save my life. That is what hope is all about.” 

 

Help remind Kim and thousands more facing cancer that Hope Isn’t Canceled by sponsoring a Hope Scarf for $30/month as part of our Hope Isn’t Canceled Sustainability Campaign.  Our goal is to send 400 Hope Scarves each month – please join us!